Best Bariatric Surgeon in Indore Get Rid of Obesity permanently With the Help of Expert Doctors!

Bariatric surgery is an operation that helps you lose weight by making changes to your digestive system. Some types of bariatric surgeries make your stomach smaller, allowing you to eat and drink less at one time and making you feel full sooner.

Bariatric weight loss Surgery is a PERMANENT and EFFECTIVE solution for morbid obesity. Unlike fad diets and other quick fixes, weight loss/bariatric surgery will make sure you maintain a healthy lifestyle for a long. It not only gets rid of your excess weight but also reduces the risk of potentially life-threatening problems like Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, Cancers, Sleep Apnea etc.

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Types of Bariatric Surgeries In Indore, surgeons use three types of operations most often: laparoscopic adjustable gastric band, gastric sleeve surgery also called sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass. Surgeons use a fourth operation, biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, less often.

Gastric Band

In a Gastric Band, the Surgeon places an inflatable band around the top part of the stomach, creating a small pouch with an adjustable opening.

Pros

  • Can be adjusted and reversed.
  • Short hospital stay and low risk of surgery-related problems.
  • No changes to intestines.
  • The lowest chance of vitamin shortage.

Cons

  • Less weight loss than other types of bariatric surgery.
  • Frequent follow-up visits to adjust band; some people may not adapt to band.
  • Possible future surgery to remove or replace a part or all of the band system.

Gastric Sleeve

In Gastric Sleeve, the Surgeon removes about 80 percent of the stomach, creating a long, banana-shaped pouch.

Pros

  • Greater weight loss than gastric band.
  • No changes to intestines.
  • No objects placed in body.
  • Short hospital stay.

Cons

  • Cannot be reversed.
  • Chance of vitamin shortage.
  • Higher chance of surgery-related problems than gastric band.
  • Chance of acid reflux.

Gastric Bypass

The surgeon staples the top part of the stomach, creating a small pouch and attaching it to the middle part of the small intestine.

Pros

  • Greater weight loss than gastric band.
  • No objects placed in the body.

Cons

  • Difficult to reverse.
  • Higher chance of vitamin shortage than the gastric band or gastric sleeve.
  • Higher chance of surgery-related problems than gastric band.
  • May increase the risk of alcohol use disorder.

Bariatric Surgery Among the Safest Surgical Procedures

While any surgical procedure has risks, bariatric surgery has been found to be one of the safest surgeries to undergo. It is considered as safe or more safe when compared to other elective surgeries.

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What is the expected post-surgery weight loss and its timeline?

Various factors influence weight-loss after surgery. However, the average weight-loss* generally observed are:

  • LAGB: 15-20%after six months
  • Gastric Balloon:25-33% after six months
  • Gastric Bypass: 70-75% in the first year
  • Gastric Sleeve: 60-65% in two years

At six months, you'll have lost a lot of weight. If you've had gastric bypass surgery, you will have lost about 30% to 40% of excess body weight. With gastric banding surgery, you lose 0.5 to 1 Kg a week - so by six months, you'll have lost 10 to 20 Kg.

Bariatric Surgery Cost in Indore Know the Cost of Bariatric Surgery, Deals & Offers in Indore

The cost of bariatric surgery depends on Various factors. Type of the hospital, mode of payment, Insurance, Technology Used, Bariatric Surgery Type, Type of Anesthesia or Sedation, Qualification / Expertise of the specialist, Extent of the surgery needed, Patient’s diagnosis, Patient’s general health, Room Category selected by the patient and Other treatment required by the patient in conjunction.

Please fill the form for the exact costing of Surgery in your condition.

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Disclaimer:

“The content of this publication has been developed by a third party content provider who is clinicians and/or medical writers and/or experts. The information contained herein is for educational purpose only and we request you to please consult a Registered Medical Practitioner or Doctor before deciding the appropriate diagnosis and treatment plan.”

Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight through diet and exercise or have serious health problems caused by obesity.

There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food you can take in. Some types of surgery also affect how you digest food and absorb nutrients. All types have risks and complications, such as infections, hernias, and blood clots.

Many people who have the surgery lose weight quickly, but regain some weight later on. If you follow diet and exercise recommendations, you can keep most of the weight off. You will also need medical follow-up for the rest of your life.

Weight-loss (Bariatric) Surgery

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Definition & Facts

Weight-loss surgery, also known as bariatric surgery, is an operation that makes changes to the digestive system. It is intended for people who are obese and need to lose weight but have not been able to do so through other means.

Types of Weight-loss Surgery

The type of weight-loss surgery that may be best for you depends on a number of factors. You should discuss surgery options with your doctor.

Weight-loss Surgery Benefits

Weight-loss surgery can help you lose weight and improve many health problems related to obesity.

Weight-loss Surgery Side Effects

Weight-loss surgery can have immediate and later-emerging side effects, and it may require follow-up procedures.

Potential Candidates for Weight-loss Surgery

Weight-loss surgery may be an option for adults who have a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more or a BMI of 35 or more with a serious health problem linked to obesity.

Clinical Trials for Weight-loss Surgery

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and other components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct and support research into many diseases and conditions.

Gastric bypass and other weight-loss surgeries — known collectively as bariatric surgery — involve making changes to your digestive system to help you lose weight. Bariatric surgery is done when diet and exercise haven't worked or when you have serious health problems because of your weight. Some procedures limit how much you can eat. Other procedures work by reducing the body's ability to absorb nutrients. Some procedures do both.

While bariatric surgery can offer many benefits, all forms of weight-loss surgery are major procedures that can pose serious risks and side effects. Also, you must make permanent healthy changes to your diet and get regular exercise to help ensure the long-term success of bariatric surgery.

Why it's done

Bariatric surgery is done to help you lose excess weight and reduce your risk of potentially life-threatening weight-related health problems, including:

  • Heart disease and stroke
  • High blood pressure
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)
  • Sleep apnea
  • Type 2 diabetes

Bariatric surgery is typically done only after you've tried to lose weight by improving your diet and exercise habits.

Who it's for

In general, bariatric surgery could be an option for you if:

  • Your body mass index (BMI) is 40 or higher (extreme obesity).
  • Your BMI is 35 to 39.9 (obesity), and you have a serious weight-related health problem, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure or severe sleep apnea. In some cases, you may qualify for certain types of weight-loss surgery if your BMI is 30 to 34 and you have serious weight-related health problems.

Bariatric surgery isn't for everyone who is severely overweight. You may need to meet certain medical guidelines to qualify for weight-loss surgery. You likely will have an extensive screening process to see if you qualify. You must also be willing to make permanent changes to lead a healthier lifestyle.

You may be required to participate in long-term follow-up plans that include monitoring your nutrition, your lifestyle and behavior, and your medical conditions.

And keep in mind that bariatric surgery is expensive. Check with your health insurance plan or your regional Medicare or Medicaid office to find out if your policy covers such surgery.

Risks

As with any major procedure, bariatric surgery poses potential health risks, both in the short term and long term.

Risks associated with the surgical procedure can include:

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Infection
  • Adverse reactions to anesthesia
  • Blood clots
  • Lung or breathing problems
  • Leaks in your gastrointestinal system
  • Death (rare)

Longer term risks and complications of weight-loss surgery vary depending on the type of surgery. They can include:

  • Bowel obstruction
  • Dumping syndrome, which leads to diarrhea, flushing, lightheadedness, nausea or vomiting
  • Gallstones
  • Hernias
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
  • Malnutrition
  • Ulcers
  • Vomiting
  • Acid reflux
  • The need for a second, or revision, surgery or procedure
  • Death (rare)

How you prepare

If you qualify for bariatric surgery, your health care team gives you instructions on how to prepare for your specific type of surgery. You may need to have various lab tests and exams before surgery. You may have restrictions on eating and drinking and which medications you can take. You may be required to start a physical activity program and to stop any tobacco use.

You may also need to prepare by planning ahead for your recovery after surgery. For instance, arrange for help at home if you think you'll need it.

What you can expect

Bariatric surgery is done in the hospital using general anesthesia. This means you're unconscious during the procedure.

The specifics of your surgery depend on your individual situation, the type of weight-loss surgery you have, and the hospital's or doctor's practices. Some weight-loss surgeries are done with traditional large, or open, incisions in your abdomen.

Today, most types of bariatric surgery are performed laparoscopically. A laparoscope is a small, tubular instrument with a camera attached. The laparoscope is inserted through small incisions in the abdomen. The tiny camera on the tip of the laparoscope allows the surgeon to see and operate inside your abdomen without making the traditional large incisions. Laparoscopic surgery can make your recovery faster and shorter, but it's not suitable for everyone.

Surgery usually takes several hours. After surgery, you awaken in a recovery room, where medical staff monitors you for any complications. Depending on your procedure, you may need to stay a few days in the hospital.

Types of bariatric surgery

Each type of bariatric surgery has pros and cons. Be sure to talk to your doctor about them. Here's a look at common types of bariatric surgery:

  • Roux-en-Y (roo-en-wy) gastric bypass.This procedure is the most common method of gastric bypass. This surgery is typically not reversible. It works by decreasing the amount of food you can eat at one sitting and reducing absorption of nutrients.

The surgeon cuts across the top of your stomach, sealing it off from the rest of your stomach. The resulting pouch is about the size of a walnut and can hold only about an ounce of food. Normally, your stomach can hold about 3 pints of food.

Then, the surgeon cuts the small intestine and sews part of it directly onto the pouch. Food then goes into this small pouch of stomach and then directly into the small intestine sewn to it. Food bypasses most of your stomach and the first section of your small intestine, and instead enters directly into the middle part of your small intestine.

  • Sleeve gastrectomy.With sleeve gastrectomy, about 80% of the stomach is removed, leaving a long, tube-like pouch. This smaller stomach can't hold as much food. It also produces less of the appetite-regulating hormone ghrelin, which may lessen your desire to eat.

Advantages to this procedure include significant weight loss and no rerouting of the intestines. Sleeve gastrectomy also requires a shorter hospital stay than most other procedures.

  • Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch.This is a two-part surgery in which the first step involves performing a procedure similar to a sleeve gastrectomy. The second surgery involves connecting the end portion of the intestine to the duodenum near the stomach (duodenal switch and biliopancreatic diversion), bypassing the majority of the intestine.

This surgery both limits how much you can eat and reduces the absorption of nutrients. While it is extremely effective, it has greater risk, including malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies.

Which type of weight-loss surgery is best for you depends on your specific situation. Your surgeon will take many factors into account, including body mass index, eating habits, other health issues, previous surgeries and the risks involved with each procedure.

After bariatric surgery

After weight-loss surgery, you generally won't be allowed to eat for one to two days so that your stomach and digestive system can heal. Then, you'll follow a specific diet for a few weeks. The diet begins with liquids only, then progresses to pureed, very soft foods, and eventually to regular foods. You may have many restrictions or limits on how much and what you can eat and drink.

You'll also have frequent medical checkups to monitor your health in the first several months after weight-loss surgery. You may need laboratory testing, blood work and various exams.

Results

Gastric bypass and other bariatric surgeries can provide long-term weight loss. The amount of weight you lose depends on your type of surgery and your change in lifestyle habits. It may be possible to lose half, or even more, of your excess weight within two years.

In addition to weight loss, gastric bypass surgery may improve or resolve conditions often related to being overweight, including:

  • Heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Osteoarthritis (joint pain)

Gastric bypass surgery can also improve your ability to perform routine daily activities, which could help improve your quality of life.

When weight-loss surgery doesn't work

Gastric bypass and other weight-loss surgeries don't always work as well as you might have hoped. If a weight-loss procedure doesn't work well or stops working, you may not lose weight and you may develop serious health problems.

Keep all of your scheduled follow-up appointments after weight-loss surgery. If you notice that you are not losing weight or you develop complications, see your doctor immediately. Your weight loss can be monitored and factors potentially contributing to your lack of weight loss evaluated.

It's also possible to not lose enough weight or to regain weight after any type of weight-loss surgery, even if the procedure itself works correctly. This weight gain can happen if you do not follow the recommended lifestyle changes, such as getting regular physical activity and eating healthy foods.

Weight-loss surgery changes the shape and function of your digestive system. This surgery may help you lose weight and manage medical conditions related to obesity. These conditions include diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, and risk factors for heart disease and stroke.

Weight-loss surgery is also known as bariatric surgery. There are various surgical procedures, but all of them help you lose weight by limiting how much food you can eat. Some procedures also limit the amount of nutrients you can absorb.

In the U.S., the most common weight-loss surgery is sleeve gastrectomy. In this procedure, the surgeon removes a large portion of the stomach to create a tubelike sleeve.

Weight-loss surgery is only one part of an overall treatment plan. Your treatment will also include nutrition guidelines, exercise and mental health care. You'll need to be willing and able to follow this long-term plan to achieve your weight-loss goals.

If you're considering weight-loss surgery, you'll meet with a number of specialists to help you decide if weight-loss surgery is an option for you.

The general medical guidelines for weight-loss surgery are based on body mass index (BMI). BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. Weight-loss surgery might be an option for an adult with a BMI of 40 or higher.

The surgery may also be an option for an adult who meets these three conditions:

  • BMI of 35 or higher
  • At least one obesity-related medical condition
  • At least six months of supervised weight-loss attempts

In some cases, weight-loss surgery may be an option for adolescents. The guidelines include:

  • BMI of 40 or higher and any obesity-related medical condition
  • BMI of 35 or higher and a severe obesity-related medical condition

Instead of using these BMI numbers as a guideline for surgery, a surgeon may use growth charts for adolescents. These charts show the standard BMI range for each age. The surgeon may recommend the procedure based on how much the adolescent's BMI is above the standard BMI range.

Depending on the type or severity of an obesity-related illness, some adults or adolescents with lower BMIs may be able to undergo weight-loss surgery.

If you're considering weight-loss surgery, you'll meet with a health care team that may include the following:

  • Primary care doctor
  • Surgeon
  • Anesthesiologist
  • Dietitian
  • Nurse specializing in weight management
  • Psychologist or psychiatrist
  • Other specialists depending on your medical conditions

Members of your team will explain what to expect before and after the procedure. They will evaluate whether you're ready for surgery and help you decide if it's an option for you. They may identify concerns to address — medical, behavioral or psychological — before you're ready for surgery.

You'll have a medical exam to diagnose any unknown obesity-related conditions. Your doctor also will test for problems that could make surgery more complicated. You may undergo tests for:

  • Sleep apnea
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver disease

You'll likely not be able to have surgery if you have these conditions:

  • Blood-clotting disorders
  • Severe heart disease that prohibits the safe use of anesthesia
  • Other conditions that increase the risk of using anesthesia

Weight loss after surgery depends on your ability to change behaviors in eating and exercise. Also, being in good mental health is important for the demands of following your treatment plan. Your team's goals are to identify psychological or behavioral risk factors, address any problems, and decide whether you're ready for surgery.

Your health care team will talk with you about the following:

  • Are you motivated to embrace lifestyle changes, set goals and educate yourself about healthy nutrition? Your team will track your ability to follow recommended changes to your diet and exercise routine.
  • Weight-loss history.What dieting and exercise plans have you used in the past to lose weight? Did you lose weight or regain weight? Patterns in weight loss and weight gain can help your team understand challenges for you and recommend strategies for post-surgical plans.
  • Eating behaviors.Irregular eating behaviors or eating disorders may contribute to obesity. These include binge eating, nighttime eating and unplanned grazing between meals. Some eating disorders are associated with other mood disorders and other mental health conditions.
  • Mood disorders.Depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or other mood disorders are associated with obesity, and these conditions may make it difficult to manage your weight. Also, people with untreated mood disorders often find it difficult to stick with new diet and exercise habits after surgery.
  • Alcohol and drug use.Problems with alcohol or drug use, as well as smoking, are associated with poor weight loss and continued substance use problems after surgery. Untreated or unmanaged problems likely prohibit the option of weight-loss surgery.
  • Suicide risk.There is an increased risk of suicide among people who have undergone weight-loss surgery. The risk is higher among people with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, substance use disorder, schizophrenia or other disorders.

If your team members recommend bariatric surgery, they will work with you to develop a treatment plan. This may include:

  • Nutrition guidelines.The dietitian will help you with nutrition guidelines, vitamin supplements and menu planning. The guidelines include changes before and after surgery.
  • Exercise plan.A nurse, occupational therapist or other specialist will help you learn appropriate exercises, develop an exercise plan and set goals.
  • Weight loss.You may be encouraged or required to lose some weight through diet and exercise before you can have surgery.
  • You may be required to begin talk therapy, drug treatment or other mental health therapy to treat an eating disorder, depression or other mental health condition. Your therapy may include developing new coping skills or addressing your concerns about body image or self-esteem.
  • If you smoke, you'll be asked to quit smoking or participate in a program to help you quit.
  • Other treatments.You'll be expected to follow treatments for other medical conditions.

These requirements are intended to help you achieve the best possible weight-loss outcomes after surgery. Also, your ability to follow through on these plans will show your team how motivated you are to follow guidelines after surgery. Weight-loss surgery can be delayed or canceled if your health care team determines that:

  • You're not psychologically or medically ready for surgery
  • You haven't made appropriate changes in your eating or exercise habits
  • You gained weight during the evaluation process

Your insurance company may cover the costs of weight-loss surgery. Your team will need to show that the procedure is medically necessary. Also, you may need to provide documented evidence that you weren't able to lose enough weight with a supervised program of diet and exercise. Medicare and some Medicaid programs may cover the costs.

It's important to research your insurance coverage and your expected out-of-pocket costs. Your hospital may have services to help you explore options for financing your surgery.

A team of doctors, nurses and other specialists will help you determine whether this is an appropriate option for you.

The process the team uses to determine if you're ready for weight-loss surgery is also there to help you make an informed decision. You will need to consider the benefits and risks, follow through with pre-surgery and post-surgery plans, and make a lifelong commitment to a new nutrition and exercise program.

Gastric bypass diet: What to eat after the surgery

The gastric bypass diet outlines what you can eat and how much after gastric bypass surgery.

A gastric bypass diet helps people who are recovering from sleeve gastrectomy and from gastric bypass surgery — also known as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass — to heal and to change their eating habits.

Your doctor or a registered dietitian will talk with you about the diet you'll need to follow after surgery, explaining what types of food and how much you can eat at each meal. Closely following your gastric bypass diet can help you lose weight safely.

The gastric bypass diet is designed to:

  • Allow your stomach to heal without being stretched by the food you eat
  • Get you used to eating the smaller amounts of food that your smaller stomach can comfortably and safely digest
  • Help you lose weight and avoid gaining weight
  • Avoid side effects and complications from the surgery

Diet recommendations after gastric bypass surgery vary depending on your individual situation.

A gastric bypass diet typically follows a staged approach to help you ease back into eating solid foods. How quickly you move from one step to the next depends on how fast your body heals and adjusts to the change in eating patterns. You can usually start eating regular foods about three months after surgery.

At each stage of the gastric bypass diet, you must be careful to:

  • Drink 64 ounces of fluid a day, to avoid dehydration.
  • Sip liquids between meals, not with meals. Wait about 30 minutes after a meal to drink anything and avoid drinking 30 minutes before a meal.
  • Eat and drink slowly, to avoid dumping syndrome — which occurs when foods and liquids enter your small intestine rapidly and in larger amounts than normal, causing nausea, vomiting, dizziness, sweating and diarrhea.
  • Eat lean, protein-rich foods daily.
  • Choose foods and drinks that are low in fats and sugar.
  • Avoid alcohol.
  • Limit caffeine, which can cause dehydration.
  • Take vitamin and mineral supplements daily as directed by your health provider.
  • Chew foods thoroughly to a pureed consistency before swallowing, once you progress beyond liquids only.

Liquids

For the first day or so after surgery, you'll only be allowed to drink clear liquids. Once you're handling clear liquids, you can start having other liquids, such as:

Liquids you can have during stage 1:

  • Broth
  • Unsweetened juice
  • Decaffeinated tea or coffee
  • Milk (skim or 1 percent)
  • Sugar-free gelatin or popsicles

Pureed foods

After about a week of tolerating liquids, you can begin to eat strained and pureed (mashed up) foods. The foods should have the consistency of a smooth paste or a thick liquid, without any solid pieces of food in the mixture.

You can eat three to six small meals a day. Each meal should consist of 4 to 6 tablespoons of food. Eat slowly — about 30 minutes for each meal.

Choose foods that will puree well, such as:

  • Lean ground meat, poultry or fish
  • Cottage cheese
  • Soft scrambled eggs
  • Cooked cereal
  • Soft fruits and cooked vegetables
  • Strained cream soups

Blend solid foods with a liquid, such as:

  • Water
  • Skim milk
  • Juice with no sugar added
  • Broth

Soft foods

After a few weeks of pureed foods, and with your doctor's OK, you can add soft foods to your diet. They should be small, tender and easily chewed pieces of food.

You can eat three to five small meals a day. Each meal should consist of one-third to one-half cup of food. Chew each bite until the food is pureed consistency before swallowing.

Soft foods include:

  • Ground lean meat or poultry
  • Flaked fish
  • Eggs
  • Cottage cheese
  • Cooked or dried cereal
  • Rice
  • Canned or soft fresh fruit, without seeds or skin
  • Cooked vegetables, without skin

Solid foods

After about eight weeks on the gastric bypass diet, you can gradually return to eating firmer foods. Start with eating three meals a day, with each meal consisting of 1 to 1-1/2 cups of food. It's important to stop eating before you feel completely full.

Depending on how you tolerate solid food, you may be able to vary the number of meals and amount of food at each meal. Talk to your dietitian about what's best for you.

Try new foods one at a time. Certain foods may cause pain, nausea or vomiting after gastric bypass surgery.

Foods that can cause problems at this stage include:

  • Breads
  • Carbonated drinks
  • Raw vegetables
  • Cooked fibrous vegetables, such as celery, broccoli, corn or cabbage
  • Tough meats or meats with gristle
  • Red meat
  • Fried foods
  • Highly seasoned or spicy foods
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Popcorn

Over time, you might be able to try some of these foods again, with the guidance of your doctor.

A new healthy diet

Gastric bypass surgery reduces the size of your stomach and changes the way food enters your intestines. After surgery, it's important to get adequate nourishment while keeping your weight-loss goals on track. Your doctor is likely to recommend that you:

  • Eat and drink slowly.To avoid dumping syndrome, take at least 30 minutes to eat your meals and 30 to 60 minutes to drink 1 cup of liquid. Wait 30 minutes before or after each meal to drink liquids.
  • Keep meals small.Eat several small meals a day. You might start with six small meals a day, then move to four meals and finally, when following a regular diet, three meals a day. Each meal should include about a half-cup to 1 cup of food.
  • Drink liquids between meals.To avoid dehydration, you'll need to drink at least 8 cups (1.9 liters) of fluids a day. But drinking too much liquid at or around mealtime can leave you feeling overly full and prevent you from eating enough nutrient-rich food.
  • Chew food thoroughly.The new opening that leads from your stomach into your small intestine is very narrow and can be blocked by larger pieces of food. Blockages prevent food from leaving your stomach and can cause vomiting, nausea and abdominal pain. Take small bites of food and chew them to a pureed consistency before swallowing.
  • Focus on high-protein foods.Eat these foods before you eat other foods in your meal.
  • Avoid foods that are high in fat and sugar.These foods travel quickly through your digestive system and cause dumping syndrome.
  • Take recommended vitamin and mineral supplements.After surgery your body won't be able to absorb enough nutrients from your food. You'll likely need to take a multivitamin supplement every day for the rest of your life.

The gastric bypass diet can help you recover from surgery and transition to a way of eating that is healthy and supports your weight-loss goals. Remember that if you return to unhealthy eating habits after weight-loss surgery, you may not lose all of your excess weight, or you may regain any weight that you do lose.

The greatest risks of the gastric bypass diet come from not following the diet properly. If you eat too much or eat food that you shouldn't, you could have complications. These include:

  • Dumping syndrome.If too much food enters your small intestine quickly, you are likely to experience nausea, vomiting, dizziness, sweating and diarrhea. Eating too much or too fast, eating foods high in fat or sugar, and not chewing your food adequately can all cause nausea or vomiting after meals.
  • Because you're not supposed to drink fluids with your meals, some people become dehydrated. That's why you need to sip 64 ounces (1.9 liters) of water and other fluids throughout the day.
  • A lack of physical activity and of fiber or fluid in your diet can cause constipation.
  • Blocked opening of your stomach pouch.Food can become lodged at the opening of your stomach pouch, even if you carefully follow the diet. Signs and symptoms of a blocked stomach opening include ongoing nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Call your doctor if you have these symptoms for more than two days.
  • Weight gain or failure to lose weight.If you continue to gain weight or fail to lose weight on the gastric bypass diet, talk to your doctor or dietitian.

When can I start exercising after surgery? top

Right away! To start, you will take easy, short walks while you are in the hospital. The key is to start slow. Listen to your body and your surgeon. If you lift weights or do sports, stay “low impact” for the first month.

Will I have to exercise after the procedure? top

For many patients, exercise is important for stress control and appetite control, as well as burning off calories.

As we age, lack of activity can lead to being frail or fragile, which is quite dangerous to overall health. Healthy bones and avoiding muscle loss partly depends on doing weekly exercise.

Most patients also think of exercise as something that must be intense and painful (like “boot camp”). Regular, modest activity is far more useful in the long term. Even elite athletes can’t stay at a “peak” every week of the year. Instead, work with your surgeon’s program to find a variety of activities that can work for you. There is no “one-size-fits-all” plan. Expect to learn and change as you go!

Nutrition top

Will I have to go on a diet before I have surgery? top

Yes. Many insurance companies require patients to be on a weight loss program before qualifying for surgery.

Many bariatric surgeons put their patients on a special pre-operative diet, usually 2 or 3 weeks just before surgery. The reason for the pre-operative diet is to shrink the liver and reduce fat in the abdomen. This helps during the procedure and makes it safer.

Some insurance companies require a physician-monitored diet three to six months prior to surgery as part of their coverage requirement. These diets are very different from the short-term diets and usually are more about food education and showing a willingness to complete appointments and to learn.

Will I have to be on a diet after the surgery? top

No. Most people think of a “diet” as a plan that leaves you hungry. That is not the way people feel after surgery.

Eventually, most patients get some form of appetite back 6-18 months after surgery. Your appetite is much weaker, and easier to satisfy than before.

This does not mean you can whatever and whenever you want. Healthier food choices are important for best results, but most patients still enjoy tasty food, and even occasional “treats”.

Is weight loss surgery a ‘cop-out’? To lose weight, should people with obesity just go on a diet and exercise? top

Many people who suffer from obesity find it hard to lose weight and keep the weight off with diet and exercise alone. This is likely due to foods available and genes.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Expert Panel stated that, without surgery, long-term weight loss is nearly impossible for those affected by severe obesity. Studies show little long-term success with diet and exercise alone.(3) Weight loss surgeries are effective in maintaining long-term weight loss, in part, because these procedures change the body’s natural responses to dieting that make weight loss so difficult. When a person goes on a diet, their body produces more hormones that cause an increase in hunger and a decrease in calories burned. This decrease in calories the body burns is more than explained by the decrease in body size. Therefore, there are significant differences between someone who has lost weight by diet and someone of the same size who has never lost weight. For example, the body of the person who reduces their weight from 200 to 170 pounds burns fewer calories than the body of someone weighing 170 pounds who has never been on a diet. This means that in order to maintain weight loss, the person who has been on a diet will have to eat fewer calories than someone who naturally weighs the same. Weight loss procedures, unlike diet, also cause biological changes that help reduce food intake. Energy (in the form of food) intake is decreased with surgery by restricting stomach size and limiting absorption. In addition, weight loss surgery changes the production of certain gut hormones (or signals) that communicate with the brain to reduce hunger, decrease appetite, and enhance the feeling of being full. In these ways, weight loss surgery, unlike dieting, produces long-term weight loss. (5)

Pregnancy top

When can I get pregnant after weight loss surgery? top

Most groups advise waiting 12-18 months after surgery before getting pregnant.

Most women are much more fertile after surgery, even with moderate weight loss.

Birth control pills do NOT work as well in patients who are overweight. Birth control pills are not very reliable during the time your weight is changing. For this reason, having an IUD or using condoms and spermicide with ALL intercourse is needed. Menstrual periods can be very irregular, and you can get pregnant when you least expect it!

Will the baby be healthy? top

Yes.

After surgery, there is much less risk of experiencing problems during pregnancy and during childbirth. There are also fewer miscarriages and stillbirths than in women with obesity who have not had surgery and weight loss.

Kids born after mom’s surgery are LESS at risk of being affected by obesity later, due to activation of certain genes during fetal growth. There is also less risk of needing a C section.

Lifestyle top

How long after weight loss surgery will I have to be from work? top

After surgery, most patients return to work in one or two weeks.

Will I lose my hair after surgery? top

Some hair loss is common between 3 and 6 months following surgery but almost always temporary.

The reasons for hair loss are not totally understood. Even if you take all recommended supplements and meet protein requirements, hair loss will be noticed until the follicles come back. Adequate intake of protein, vitamins, and minerals will help to ensure hair re-growth, and avoid longer term thinning.

Will I need to have plastic surgery after weight loss? top

Some patients may choose to have plastic surgery, but this depends on many factors.

Do most people who have weight loss surgery regain their weight? top

No. A small number of patients can regain their weight but the vast majority lose significant weight and keep this weight off.

More than 95% of patients will successfully lose half of their extra body weight or more after surgery for weight loss. (1) Roux en Y gastric bypass patients, for example, on average lose approximately 70% of their extra body weight initially, and 2 years or more after surgery will regain approximately 5% of their extra body weight. (2) Compared to these results, patients who attempt weight loss without surgery, on average, are able to lose little weight and may gain weight in the long-term. (3)

Vitamins & Medications top

Can I go off some of my medications after weight loss surgery? top

Many patients are able to stop using some medications.

Will I have to take vitamins after surgery? top

You will need to take a multivitamin for life.

You may need higher doses of certain vitamins or minerals, especially Iron, Calcium, and Vitamin D. You will also need to have at least yearly lab checks. Insurance almost never pays for vitamin and mineral supplements but usually does pay for labs. You can pay for supplements out of a flex medical account.

Do weight loss surgery patients have serious health problems caused by vitamin deficiency? top

As long as patients take their appropriate vitamins, it is rare to have health problems from vitamin deficiency.

Weight loss surgery can lead to reduced amounts of vitamins and minerals because people eat less and may absorb less in the intestines. Weight loss surgeries have different effects on vitamins and minerals based on how much change in absorption they cause. Deficiencies in vitamins, minerals, and protein can negatively affect health causing:

  • fatigue (feeling tired)
  • anemia (low levels of red blood cells that carry oxygen through your body)
  • bone and muscle loss
  • impaired night vision
  • low immunity (your body’s ability to stay healthy)
  • loss of nerve function (can affect your senses such as touch, taste, and smell)
  • mental function deficits (changes how clearly you think)

Fortunately, nutrient deficiencies following surgery can be easily avoided with a good diet and the use of supplements including vitamins, minerals, and sometimes protein supplements. Before and after surgery, patients are advised of the appropriate diet and vitamin supplement needed. Most weight loss surgery programs also require patients to have their vitamins and minerals checked on a regular basis after surgery. Nutrient deficiencies and any associated health problems are preventable with monitoring and patients following diet and supplement (vitamin and mineral) recommendations. Health problems due to deficiencies usually occur in patients who do not regularly follow-up to monitor healthy vitamin and mineral levels. Be sure you stay in touch with your weight loss surgery team for best results!

Mental Health top

Is obesity caused by food addiction, similar to alcoholism or drug dependency? top

“Food addiction” as a cause of obesity is extremely rare.

Although some people with obesity have eating disorders, such as binge eating disorder syndrome, most people have obesity caused by many factors. When treating addiction, such as alcohol and drugs, one of the first steps is to stop using drugs or alcohol. This does not work with obesity as we need to eat to live. Also, there may be other issues causing a person’s weight gain. Weight gain generally occurs when the amount of food eaten is greater than the number of calories burned. There are other conditions, however, that affect weight gain that do not involve too much eating or a less active lifestyle including:

  • Poor sleeping habits
  • Eating foods that may increase body fat (sugar, high fructose corn syrup, trans fat, processed meats and processed grains)
  • Low intake of fat-fighting foods (fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, quality protein)
  • Stress and mental distress
  • Many types of medications
  • Pollutants

Obesity also leads to more obesity, which is one of the reasons why the disease is considered progressive. Weight gain causes a number of signals (hormones) in the body that increase the risk for even greater weight gain and obesity. To make matters worse, obesity affects certain body functions that control appetite and hunger in a manner that can cause an increase in the amount of food eaten at any given meal and the desire to eat more often. There are many causes for obesity and the disease of obesity is far more than just an ‘addiction’ toward food. The treatment of obesity only as an addiction may help for a very small percentage of individuals whose only underlying cause for obesity is excessive and addictive eating, but would be unlikely to benefit most people, particularly those individuals affected by severe obesity.

Does weight loss surgery increase the risk for alcohol abuse? top

There is a small group of patients after weight loss surgery who have a problem with alcohol abuse. Most of those people, but not all, already had experiences with alcohol abuse before surgery.

Recommended precautions after weight loss surgery:

  • Avoid alcoholic beverages during the rapid weight loss period, and then drink only rarely
  • Be aware that even small amounts of alcohol can cause intoxication (‘being drunk’)
  • Avoid driving or operating heavy equipment after drinking any alcohol
  • Remember that you may feel less intoxicated than you are, and will not be a reliable judge of whether it is safe for you to drive

after drinking.

  • Seek help if drinking becomes a problem

If you feel drinking alcohol may be an issue for you after surgery, please contact your primary care doctor or surgeon and discuss this further. They will be able to help you identify resources available to address any alcohol-related issues.

It has been found in scientific research that a small percentage of weight loss surgery patients report having problems with alcohol after surgery (7-10%). (6) Many who abuse alcohol after surgery had problems with alcohol abuse at some time prior to surgery, but occasionally alcohol problems can arise in patients who never had such issues before their surgery. Alcohol sensitivity is increased after weight loss surgery so that the effects of alcohol are felt with fewer drinks than before surgery. Studies also find that with certain weight loss procedures (such as the gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy), drinking an alcoholic beverage increases blood alcohol to levels that are considerably higher than before surgery or in comparison to the alcohol levels of individuals who have not had a weight loss procedure. In addition, studies have found that alcohol takes much longer to clear out of a person’s system if they have had weight loss surgery, which can pose safety and legal hazards for driving. Furthermore, it has been found that some patients may feel as though they are sober (‘not drunk’) even when they are over the legal blood alcohol limit for driving. For all of these reasons, weight loss surgery patients are advised to take precautions regarding alcohol.

Does weight loss surgery increase the risk for suicide? top

After surgery, most patients have improved mental health but there may be a small increase in the risk of suicide. This is why patients are required to have a mental health screening before surgery.

People affected by severe obesity who are seeking weight loss surgery are more likely to suffer from depression or anxiety and to have lower self-esteem and overall quality of life than someone who is normal weight. Weight loss surgery results in significant improvement in mental health for the majority of patients. However, studies have found a small but significant increase in suicide following weight loss surgery. (7, 8) In some cases, these may have been patients with undiagnosed mental disorders, and in others, patients may have experienced major life stressors that can increase the risk for suicide, but in rare cases, the suicides are unexplained. For this reason, comprehensive bariatric programs require psychological evaluations prior to weight loss surgery. Many programs have therapists available for patient counseling after surgery. In addition, if a patient sees a psychologist or psychiatrist before surgery, they should continue seeing them after surgery.

Risks top

Is the chance of dying from weight loss surgery more than the chance of dying from obesity? top

No. Weight loss surgery is very safe and decreases the chance of dying from obesity. In fact, weight loss surgery is safer than removing the gallbladder or having a knee replacement.

A recent study of 209,116 patients found the risk of death from weight loss surgery was 0.16%, or approximately 1 in 600. (4) This rate is considerably less than most other surgeries, including gallbladder and hip replacement surgery. Large studies find that the risk of death from any cause is considerably less for patients after weight loss surgery than for those who have severe obesity and have never had the surgery. Patients who have weight loss surgery have a reduction in their risk of death by 40%. Death related to diabetes is reduced by more than 90% and from heart disease by more than 50% for patients after weight loss surgery. (3) The benefits of weight loss surgery far outweigh the risks. As with any serious surgical operation, the decision to have weight loss surgery should be discussed with your surgeon, family members, and loved ones.

Diet after gastric banding

You had laparoscopic gastric banding. This surgery made your stomach smaller by closing off part of your stomach with an adjustable band. After surgery you will eat less food, and you will not be able to eat quickly.

Your health care provider will teach you about foods you can eat and foods you should avoid. It is very important to follow these diet guidelines.

When you go Home From the Hospital

You will eat only liquid or pureed food for 2 to 3 weeks after your surgery. You will slowly add in soft foods, and then regular foods.

When you start eating solid foods again, you will feel full very quickly. Just a few bites of solid food will fill you up. This is because your new stomach pouch holds only a tablespoonful of food at first, about the size of a walnut.

Your pouch may get larger over time. You DO NOT want to stretch it out, so DO NOT eat more than your provider advises. When your pouch is larger, it will not hold more than about 1 cup (250 milliliters) of chewed food. A normal stomach can hold up to 4 cups (1 liter, L) of chewed food.

You may lose weight quickly in the first 3 to 6 months after surgery. During this time, you may have:

  • Body aches
  • Feel tired and cold
  • Dry skin
  • Mood changes
  • Hair loss or hair thinning

These symptoms are normal. They should go away as your body gets used to your weight loss.

A new way of Eating

Remember to eat slowly and chew each bite very slowly and completely. DO NOT swallow food until it is smooth. The opening between your new stomach pouch and the large part of the stomach is very small. Food that is not chewed well can block this opening.

  • Take 20 to 30 minutes to eat a meal. If you vomit or have pain under your breastbone during or after eating, you may be eating too fast.
  • Eat 6 small meals during the day instead of 3 bigger meals. DO NOT snack between meals.
  • STOP EATING AS SOON AS YOU FEEL FULL.
  • DO NOT eat if you are not hungry.
  • Use small plates and utensils to help control portion sizes.

Some foods you eat may cause some pain or discomfort if you do not chew them completely. Some of these are pasta, rice, bread, raw vegetables, and meats. Adding a low-fat sauce, broth gravy can make them easier to digest. Other foods that may cause discomfort are dry foods, such as popcorn and nuts, or fibrous foods, such as celery and corn.

You will need to drink up to 8 cups (64 ounces), or 2 L, of water or other calorie-free liquids every day:

  • DO NOT drink anything for 30 minutes after a meal. Also, DO NOT drink anything while you are eating. The liquid will fill you up, and this may keep you from eating enough healthy food. Or it may lubricate the food and allow you to eat more than you should.
  • Take small sips when you are drinking. DO NOT gulp.
  • Ask your provider before using a straw, since it may bring air in your stomach.

Follow Your Diet Carefully

You will need to make sure you are getting enough protein, vitamins, and minerals while you are losing weight quickly. Eating mostly protein, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains will help your body get the nutrients it needs.

Protein may be the most important of these foods. Your body needs protein to build muscles and other body tissues. Low-fat protein choices include:

  • Skinless chicken
  • Lean beef or pork
  • Fish
  • Whole eggs or egg whites
  • Beans
  • Dairy products, which includes low-fat or nonfat hard cheeses, cottage cheese, milk, and yogurt

Combining foods with texture together with protein helps people who have a gastric band stay satisfied longer. This includes things like salad with grilled chicken or celery with peanut butter.

Because you are eating less, your body may not be getting enough of some important vitamins and minerals. Your provider may prescribe these:

  • Multivitamin with iron
  • Vitamin B12
  • Calcium (1,200 mg per day) and vitamin D. Your body can absorb only about 500 mg of calcium at a time. Divide your calcium into 2 or 3 doses per day.

You will need to have regular checkups to keep track of your weight and to make sure you are eating well. These visits are a good time to talk about any problems you are having with your diet, or about other issues related to your surgery and recovery.

Calories Still Count

Read food labels to avoid high-calorie foods. It is important to get as many nutrients as you can without eating too many calories.

  • DO NOT eat foods that contain a lot of fats, sugar, or carbohydrates, particularly "slider" foods. These are foods that dissolve easily or pass quickly through the band.
  • DO NOT drink much alcohol. Alcohol contains a lot of calories, but it does not provide nutrition. Avoid it completely if you can.
  • DO NOT drink fluids that have a lot of calories. Avoid drinks that have sugar, fructose, or corn syrup in them.
  • Avoid carbonated drinks, such as soda and sparkling water. Let soda go flat before drinking.

If you gain weight or your weight loss is slower than expected, ask yourself:

  • Am I eating too many high-calorie foods or drinks?
  • Am I eating too often?
  • Am I exercising enough?

Gastric bypass surgery

Gastric bypass is surgery that helps you lose weight by changing how your stomach and small intestine handle the food you eat.

After the surgery, your stomach will be smaller. You will feel full with less food.

The food you eat will no longer go into some parts of your stomach and small intestine that absorb food. Because of this, your body will not get all of the calories from the food you eat.

Description

You will have general anesthesia before this surgery. You will be asleep and pain-free.

There are 2 steps during gastric bypass surgery:

  • The first step makes your stomach smaller. Your surgeon uses staples to divide your stomach into a small upper section and a larger bottom section. The top section of your stomach (called the pouch) is where the food you eat will go. The pouch is about the size of a walnut. It holds only about 1 ounce (oz) or 28 grams (g) of food. Because of this you will eat less and lose weight.
  • The second step is the bypass. Your surgeon connects a small part of your small intestine (the jejunum) to a small hole in your pouch. The food you eat will now travel from the pouch into this new opening and into your small intestine. As a result, your body will absorb fewer calories.

Gastric bypass can be done in two ways. With open surgery, your surgeon makes a large surgical cut to open your belly. The bypass is done by working on your stomach, small intestine, and other organs.

Another way to do this surgery is to use a tiny camera, called a laparoscope. This camera is placed in your belly. The surgery is called laparoscopy. The scope allows the surgeon to see inside your belly.

In this surgery:

  • The surgeon makes 4 to 6 small cuts in your belly.
  • The scope and instruments needed to perform the surgery are inserted through these cuts.
  • The camera is connected to a video monitor in the operating room. This allows the surgeon to view inside your belly while doing the operation.

Advantages of laparoscopy over open surgery include:

  • Shorter hospital stay and quicker recovery.
  • Less pain.
  • Smaller scars and a lower risk of getting a herniaor infection.

This surgery takes about 2 to 4 hours.

Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

You were in the hospital to have gastric surgery for weight loss. This article tells you what you need to know to take care of yourself in the days and weeks after the operation.

When You're in the Hospital

You had gastric bypass surgery to help you lose weight. Your surgeon used staples to divide your stomach into a small upper section, called a pouch, and a larger bottom section. Then your surgeon sewed a section of your small intestine to a small opening in this small stomach pouch. The food you eat will now go into your small stomach pouch, then into your small intestine.

You probably spent 1 to 3 days in the hospital. When you go home you will be eating liquids or puréed foods. You should be able to move around without too much problem.

What to Expect at Home

You will lose weight quickly over the first 3 to 6 months. During this time, you may:

  • Have body aches
  • Feel tired and cold
  • Have dry skin
  • Have mood changes
  • Have hair loss or hair thinning

These problems should go away as your body gets used to your weight loss and your weight becomes stable. Because of this quick weight loss, you will need to be careful that you get all of the nutrition and vitamins you need as you recover.

Weight loss slows down after 12 to 18 months.

Diet

You will remain on liquid or puréed food for 2 or 3 weeks after surgery. You will slowly add soft foods and then regular food, as your health care provider told you to do. Remember to eat small portions and chew each bite very slowly and completely.

Do not eat and drink at the same time. Drink fluids at least 30 minutes after you eat food. Drink slowly. Sip when you are drinking. Do not gulp. Your provider may tell you not to use a straw, as it may bring air into your stomach.

Your provider will teach you about foods that you should eat and foods you should stay away from.

Activity

Being active soon after surgery will help you recover more quickly. During the first week:

  • Start walking after surgery. Move around the house and shower, and use the stairs at home.
  • If it hurts when you do something, stop doing that activity.

If you have laparoscopic surgery, you should be able to do most of your regular activities in 2 to 4 weeks. It may take up to 12 weeks if you have open surgery.

Before this time, Do not:

  • Lift anything heavier than 10 to 15 pounds (5 to 7 kg) until you see your provider
  • Do any activity that involves pushing or pulling
  • Push yourself too hard. Increase how much you exercise slowly
  • Drive or use machinery if you are taking narcotic pain medicine. These medicines will make you drowsy. Driving and using machinery is not safe when you are taking them. Check with your provider about when you may start driving again after your operation.

DO:

  • Take short walks and go up and down stairs.
  • Try getting up and moving around if you are having some pain in your belly. It may help.

Make sure your home is set up for your recovery, to prevent falls and make sure you are safe in the bathroom.

If your provider says it is OK, you may start an exercise program 2 to 4 weeks after surgery.

You do not need to join a gym to exercise. If you have not exercised or been active in a long time, be sure to start off slowly to prevent injuries. Taking a 5- to 10-minute walk every day is a good start. Increase this amount until you are walking 15 minutes twice a day.

Wound Care

You may change the dressing every day if your provider tells you to do so. Be sure to change your dressing if it gets dirty or wet.

You may have bruising around your wounds. This is normal. It will go away on its own. The skin around your incisions may be a little red. This is normal, too.

Do not wear tight clothing that rubs against your incisions while they heal.

Keep your dressing (bandage) on your wound clean and dry. If there are sutures (stitches) or staples, they will be removed about 7 to 10 days after surgery. Some stitches can dissolve on their own. Your provider will tell you if you have them.

Unless you are told otherwise, do not shower until after your follow-up appointment with your provider. When you can shower, let water run over your incision, but do not scrub or let the water beat down on it.

Do not soak in a bathtub, swimming pool, or hot tub until your provider says it is OK.

Press a pillow over your incisions when you need to cough or sneeze.

Drugs

You may need to take some medicines when you go home.

  • You may need to give yourself shots underneath the skin of a blood-thinning drug for 2 or more weeks to prevent a blood clot. Your provider will show you how.
  • You may need to take medicine to prevent gallstones.
  • You will need to take certain vitamins that your body may not absorb well from your food. Two of these are vitamin B-12 and vitamin D.
  • You may need to take calcium and iron supplements as well.

Aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and some other drugs may harm the lining of your stomach or even cause ulcers. Talk with your provider before you take these drugs.

Follow-up

To help you recover from surgery and manage all the changes in your lifestyle, you will see your surgeon and many other providers.

By the time you leave the hospital, you will likely have a follow-up appointment scheduled with your surgeon within a few weeks. You will see your surgeon several more times in the first year after your surgery.

You may also have appointments with:

  • A nutritionist or dietitian, who will teach you how to eat correctly with your smaller stomach. You will also learn about what foods and drinks you should have after surgery.
  • A psychologist, who can help you follow your eating and exercise guidelines and deal with the feelings or concerns you may have after surgery.
  • You will need blood tests for the rest of your life to make sure that your body is getting enough important vitamins and minerals from food after your surgery.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if:

  • You have more redness, pain, warmth, swelling, or bleeding around your incision.
  • The wound is larger or deeper or looks dark or dried out.
  • The drainage from your incision does not decrease in 3 to 5 days or increases.
  • The drainage becomes thick, tan or yellow and has a bad smell (pus).
  • Your temperature is above 100°F (37.7°C) for more than 4 hours.
  • You have pain that your pain medicine is not helping.
  • You have trouble breathing.
  • You have a cough that does not go away.
  • You cannot drink or eat.
  • Your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow.
  • Your stools are loose, or you have diarrhea.
  • You are vomiting after eating.

Laparoscopic gastric banding

 

Laparoscopic gastric banding is surgery to help with weight loss. The surgeon places a band around the upper part of your stomach to create a small pouch to hold food. The band limits the amount of food you can eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food.

After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band to make food pass more slowly or quickly through your stomach.

Gastric bypass surgery is a related topic.

Description

You will receive general anesthesia before this surgery. You will be asleep and unable to feel pain.

The surgery is done using a tiny camera that is placed in your belly. This type of surgery is called laparoscopy. The camera is called a laparoscope. It allows your surgeon to see inside your belly. In this surgery:

  • Your surgeon will make 1 to 5 small surgical cuts in your abdomen. Through these small cuts, the surgeon will place a camera and the instruments needed to perform the surgery.
  • Your surgeon will place a band around the upper part of your stomach to separate it from the lower part. This creates a small pouch that has a narrow opening that goes into the larger, lower part of your stomach.
  • The surgery does not involve any cutting or stapling inside your belly.
  • Your surgery may take only 30 to 60 minutes if your surgeon has done a lot of these procedures.

When you eat after having this surgery, the small pouch will fill up quickly. You will feel full after eating just a small amount of food. The food in the small upper pouch will slowly empty into the main part of your stomach.

Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge

 

You had gastric banding surgery to help with weight loss. This article tells you how to take care of yourself after the procedure.

When You're in the Hospital

You had laparoscopic gastric banding surgery to help with weight loss. Your surgeon placed a band around the upper part of your stomach to separate it from the lower part. The upper part of your stomach is now a small pouch with a narrow opening that goes into the larger, lower part of your stomach.

The surgery was done using a camera placed in your belly. The camera is called a laparoscope. This type of surgery is called laparoscopy.

What to Expect at Home

You may lose weight quickly over the first 3 to 6 months. During this time, you may experience:

  • Body aches
  • Tiredness and feel cold
  • Dry skin
  • Mood changes
  • Hair loss or hair thinning

These problems should go away as your body gets used to your weight loss and your weight becomes stable. Weight loss may be slower after this.

Activity

Being active soon after surgery will help you recover more quickly. During the first week:

  • Take short walks and go up and down stairs.
  • Try getting up and moving around if you are having some pain in your belly. It may help relieve the pain.

If it hurts when you do something, stop doing that activity.

If you have laparoscopic surgery, you should be able to do most of your regular activities in 2 to 4 weeks.

Diet

Laparoscopic gastric banding made your stomach smaller by closing off part of your stomach with an adjustable band. After surgery you will eat less food, and you will not be able to eat quickly.

Your health care provider will teach you about foods you can eat and foods you should avoid. It is very important to follow these diet guidelines.

You will eat only liquid or puréed food for 2 to 3 weeks after your surgery. You will slowly add in soft foods, and then regular foods.

Wound Care

Keep your dressings (bandage) on your wounds clean and dry. If you have sutures (stitches) or staples, they will be removed about 7 to 10 days after surgery. Some stitches can dissolve on their own. Your provider will tell if you have this kind.

Change the dressings (bandages) every day if you were told to do so. Be sure to change them more often if they get dirty or wet.

You may have bruising around your wound. This is normal. It will go away on its own. The skin around your incisions may be a little red. This is normal, too.

Do not wear tight clothing that rubs against your incisions while they heal.

Unless you are told otherwise, do not shower until after your follow-up appointment with your provider. When you can shower, let water run over your incision, but do not scrub it or let the water beat down on it.

Do not soak in a bathtub, swimming pool, or hot tub until your doctor tells you it is OK.

Follow-up

By the time you leave the hospital, you will likely have a follow-up appointment scheduled with your surgeon within a few weeks. You will see your surgeon several more times in the first year after your surgery.

You may also have appointments with:

  • A nutritionist or dietitian, who will teach you how to eat correctly with your smaller stomach. You will also learn about what foods and drinks you should have after surgery.
  • A psychologist, who can help you follow your eating and exercise guidelines and deal with the feelings or concerns you may have after surgery.

The band around your stomach is filled with saline (saltwater). It is connected to a container (access port) that is placed under your skin in your upper belly. Your surgeon can make the band tighter or looser by increasing or decreasing the amount of saline in the band. To do this, your surgeon will insert a needle through your skin into the access port.

Your surgeon can make the band tighter or looser any time after you have this surgery. It may be tightened or loosened if you are:

  • Not losing enough weight
  • Having problems eating
  • Vomiting after you eat

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if:

  • Your temperature is above 101°F (38.3°C).
  • Your incisions are bleeding, red, warm to the touch, or have a thick, yellow, green, or milky drainage.
  • You have pain that your pain medicine is not helping.
  • You have trouble breathing.
  • You have a cough that does not go away.
  • You cannot drink or eat.
  • Your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow.
  • Your stools are loose, or you have diarrhea.
  • You are vomiting after eating.

Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

 

Vertical sleeve gastrectomy is surgery to help with weight loss. The surgeon removes a large portion of your stomach.

The new, smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food.

Description

You will receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This is medicine that keeps you asleep and pain-free.

The surgery is usually done using a tiny camera that is placed in your belly. This type of surgery is called laparoscopy. The camera is called a laparoscope. It allows your surgeon to see inside your belly.

In this surgery:

  • Your surgeon makes 2 to 5 small cuts (incisions) in your belly.
  • The scope and instruments needed to perform the surgery are inserted through these cuts.
  • The camera is connected to a video monitor in the operating room. This allows the surgeon to view inside your belly while doing the operation.
  • A harmless gas is pumped into the belly to expand it. This gives the surgeon room to work.
  • Your surgeon removes most of your stomach.
  • The remaining portions of your stomach are joined together using surgical staples. This creates a long vertical tube or banana-shaped stomach.
  • The surgery does not involve cutting or changing the sphincter muscles that allow food to enter or leave the stomach.
  • The scope and other tools are removed. The cuts are stitched closed.

The surgery takes 60 to 90 minutes.

Weight-loss surgery may increase your risk for gallstones. Your surgeon may recommend having a cholecystectomy. This is surgery to remove the gallbladder. It may be done before the weight-loss surgery or at the same time.

Your diet after gastric bypass surgery

 

Gastric bypass surgery changes the way your body handles food. This article will tell you how to adapt to a new way of eating after the surgery.

What to Expect at Home

You had gastric bypass surgery. This surgery made your stomach smaller by closing off most of your stomach with staples. It changed the way your body handles the food you eat. You will eat less food, and your body will not absorb all the calories from the food you eat.

Your health care provider will teach you about foods you can eat and foods you should avoid. It is very important to follow these diet guidelines.

When you go Home From the Hospital

You will eat only liquid or puréed food for 2 or 3 weeks after the surgery. You will slowly add in soft foods, then regular food.

  • When you start eating solid foods again, you will feel full very quickly at first. Just a few bites of solid food will fill you up. This is because your new stomach pouch holds only a tablespoonful of food at first, about the size of a walnut.
  • Your pouch will get slightly larger over time. You do not want to stretch it out, so do not eat more than your provider recommends. When your pouch is larger, it will not hold more than about 1 cup (250 milliliter) of chewed food. A normal stomach can hold a little over 4 cups (1 liter, L) of chewed food.

You will lose weight quickly over the first 3 to 6 months. During this time, you may:

  • Have body aches
  • Feel tired and cold
  • Have dry skin
  • Have mood changes
  • Have hair loss or thinning hair

These symptoms are normal. They should go away as you take in more protein and calories as your body gets used to your weight loss.

A new way of Eating

Remember to eat slowly and chew each bite very slowly and completely. Do not swallow food until it is smooth. The opening between your new stomach pouch and your intestines is very small. Food that is not chewed well can block this opening.

  • Take at least 20 to 30 minutes to eat a meal. If you vomit or have pain under your breastbone during or after eating, you may be eating too fast.
  • Eat 6 small meals throughout the day instead of 3 big meals. Do not snack between meals.
  • Stop eating as soon as you are full.

Some foods you eat may cause some pain or discomfort if you do not chew them completely. Some of these are pasta, rice, bread, raw vegetables, and meats, especially steak. Adding a low-fat sauce, broth, or gravy can make them easier to digest. Other foods that may cause discomfort are dry foods, such as popcorn and nuts, or fibrous foods, such as celery and corn.

You will need to drink up to 8 cups (2 L) of water or other calorie-free liquids every day. Follow these guidelines for drinking:

  • Do not drink anything for 30 minutes after you eat food. Also, do not drink anything while you are eating. The liquid will fill you up. This may keep you from eating enough healthy food. It can also lubricate food and make it easy for you to eat more than you should.
  • Take small sips when you are drinking. Do not gulp.
  • Ask your provider before using a straw, since it may bring air in your stomach.

Follow Your Diet Carefully

You will need to make sure you are getting enough protein, vitamins, and minerals while you are losing weight quickly. Eating mostly protein, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains will help your body get the nutrients it needs.

Protein may be the most important of these foods early after surgery. Your body needs protein to build muscles and other body tissues, and to heal well after surgery. Low-fat protein choices include:

  • Skinless chicken.
  • Lean beef (chopped meat is tolerated well) or pork.
  • Whole eggs or egg whites.
  • Dairy products, which includes low-fat or nonfat hard cheeses, cottage cheese, milk, and yogurt.

After gastric bypass surgery, your body will not absorb some important vitamins and minerals. You will need to take these vitamins and minerals for the rest of your life:

  • Multivitamin with iron.
  • Vitamin B12.
  • Calcium (1200 mg per day) and vitamin D. Your body can absorb only about 500 mg of calcium at a time. Divide your calcium into 2 or 3 doses during the day. Calcium must be taken in the "citrate" form.

You may need to take other supplements also.

You will need to have regular checkups with your provider to keep track of your weight and to make sure you are eating well. These visits are a good time to talk with your provider about any problems you are having with your diet, or about other issues related to your surgery and recovery.

Calories Still Count

Avoid foods that are high in calories. It is important to get all of the nutrition you need without eating too many calories.

  • Do not eat foods that have a lot of fats, sugar, or carbohydrates.
  • Do not drink much alcohol. Alcohol has a lot of calories, but it does not provide nutrition.
  • Do not drink fluids that have a lot of calories. Avoid drinks that have sugar, fructose, or corn syrup in them.
  • Avoid carbonated drinks (drinks with bubbles), or let them go flat before drinking.

Portions and serving sizes still count. Your dietitian or nutritionist can give you suggested serving sizes of the foods in your diet.

If you gain weight after gastric bypass surgery, ask yourself:

  • Am I eating too many high-calorie foods or drinks?
  • Am I getting enough protein?
  • Am I eating too often?
  • Am I exercising enough?

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if:

  • You are gaining weight or you stop losing weight.
  • You are vomiting after eating.
  • You have diarrhea most days.
  • You feel tired all the time.
  • You have dizziness or are sweating.